Wildlife guidelines

Watching undisturbed wildlife in its natural environment is a great experience. To avoid disturbance, you are asked to be considerate and follow these wildlife guidelines. AECO’s Wildlife Guidelines cover walrus, seals, reindeer, Arctic fox, birds, polar bears and cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises).

 

AECO's Wildlife Guidelines

AECO's Wildlife Guidelines

AECO’s Wildlife Guidelines cover walrus, seals, reindeer, Arctic fox, birds, polar bears and cetaceans (whales and porpoises).

 

All wildlife guidelines

Arctic fox

The cunning bi-colored hunter

Arctic fox

The Arctic fox, also known as the white fox, polar fox, or snow fox, is a small-sized fox native to and common throughout the Arctic. It is well adapted to living in cold environments.

Arctic fox guidelines

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Birds in the Arctic

Experiencing – without disturbing – Arctic birdlife

Birds in the Arctic

Birdlife in the Arctic is diverse yet unique. The large numbers of birds during this period is a distinctive feature, since most bird species only spend the summer in the Arctic.

 

Bird guidelines

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Cetaceans

Whales, dolphins and porpoises

Cetaceans

Encounters with cetaceans are a common phenomenon in the Arctic and the number of species during the summer is around 15. The variety is great – ranging from the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale, to one of the smallest cetaceans of them all, the harbor porpoise – as well as perhaps the most peculiar of them all, the narwhal.

Cetaceans guidelines

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Polar bear

The white king of the Arctic

Polar bear

Polar bears can be encountered in wide-ranging areas of the Arctic. Although most polar bears are born on land, they spend most of their lives on the sea ice.

Polar bear guidelines

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Reindeer

Antler clad herbivore of the Arctic

Reindeer

The reindeer, also known as caribou in North America, is a species of deer with circumpolar distribution native to the Arctic, the Subarctic and some alpine areas. There are several sub-species of reindeer with variations in size, color and antler appearance.

Reindeer guidelines

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Seals

True seals of the north

Seals

There are six species of true seals in the Atlantic Arctic; harbor seal, ringed seal, harp seal, hooded seal, bearded seal and grey seal.

Seal guidelines

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Walrus

The tooth-walkers of the Arctic

Walrus

The sight, sound – and not at least smell of a large group of walrus, is quite impressive. As the number of walrus and walrus haul-outs is increasing in some areas of the Arctic, so is the chance to see them.

Walrus Guidelines

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